clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile

Eight Great Poké Places in South Florida

There are more places than you'd think.

View as Map

Hawaiian fish salad, better known as poké, is a heaven sent loophole in salad cuisine. There's hardly any "salad" involved, only raw fish, soy sauce, fruit and seaweed.

It's slowly making its way to our coast, giving us a taste of what California has been raving about for ever. Miami, being the developing city it is, never fails to catch up.

Here's where you can try poke for yourself:

Read More
Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
If you book a reservation through an Eater link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics policy.

180° @ the DRB

Copy Link

180's spicy tuna poke is a concoction green onions, sesame seeds, soy sauce, ozeki sake, sriracha, miso, mango avocado salsa and, of course, diced raw tuna. In a death match against the finest ceviche within a 100-mile radius, this poke would win.

Photo via 180° @ the DRB

Azul at Mandarin Oriental, Miami

Copy Link

Azul's signature poke appetizer is also its most famous. You can actually eat it, or you can just order it to marvel at its beauty. If you decide on the former, you'll find pickled mushrooms, macadamia nut-sprinkled tuna and white soy.

doraku sushi brickell

Copy Link

Doraku takes a simplistic approach with its poke. It serves the ahi tuna with just sweet chili soy sauce, poke sauce, red onions and mixed greens. For the poke feel, but a little more sustenance, there's a seafood donburi served with white rice.

GG's Waterfront Bar & Grill

Copy Link

It may look like a regular, standard, slightly fancier poke, but it's got one thing that sets it apart from every other poké out there, and it's not the flower. It's Sriracha.

Served inside a cocoon of sliced avocado (where we all wished we lived) is Lique's tuna poke. The waterfront view almost makes you feel like you caught the fish yourself.

Prime Fish

Copy Link

Prime Fish offers three varieties of poke: Bigeye tuna, salmon and hamachi. The Hawaiian Bigeye tuna poke is dressed in soy sauce and toasted macadamia nuts. The Salmon lomi-lomi (Hawaiian salmon tomato salad) comes with maui onion and wasabi pees. The Hamachi (Yellowfish tuna) is served with green papaya, lime chilies and toasted peanuts. That's a poke bowl for each member of Destiny's child.

Red the Steakhouse

Copy Link

Poke in a steakhouse? It's Miami, remember? Red happens to have an entire raw bar, stacked with oysters, shrimp cocktails, lobster, stone crab and, of course, tuna poké. The Sushi Grade tuna is served with pineapple, wakame, cucumber and sesame. Sushi Grade means it's totally safe to eat raw, an important quality to have when you're poke.

The River Seafood & Oyster Bar

Copy Link

If oyster is in the name, fish is in the game. The River Seafood & Oyster serves a poke bowl over sushi rice with avocado and chiles. It's like the bibimbap of Hawaii.

180° @ the DRB

Photo via 180° @ the DRB

180's spicy tuna poke is a concoction green onions, sesame seeds, soy sauce, ozeki sake, sriracha, miso, mango avocado salsa and, of course, diced raw tuna. In a death match against the finest ceviche within a 100-mile radius, this poke would win.

Photo via 180° @ the DRB

Azul at Mandarin Oriental, Miami

Azul's signature poke appetizer is also its most famous. You can actually eat it, or you can just order it to marvel at its beauty. If you decide on the former, you'll find pickled mushrooms, macadamia nut-sprinkled tuna and white soy.

doraku sushi brickell

Doraku takes a simplistic approach with its poke. It serves the ahi tuna with just sweet chili soy sauce, poke sauce, red onions and mixed greens. For the poke feel, but a little more sustenance, there's a seafood donburi served with white rice.

GG's Waterfront Bar & Grill

It may look like a regular, standard, slightly fancier poke, but it's got one thing that sets it apart from every other poké out there, and it's not the flower. It's Sriracha.

Lique

Served inside a cocoon of sliced avocado (where we all wished we lived) is Lique's tuna poke. The waterfront view almost makes you feel like you caught the fish yourself.

Prime Fish

Prime Fish offers three varieties of poke: Bigeye tuna, salmon and hamachi. The Hawaiian Bigeye tuna poke is dressed in soy sauce and toasted macadamia nuts. The Salmon lomi-lomi (Hawaiian salmon tomato salad) comes with maui onion and wasabi pees. The Hamachi (Yellowfish tuna) is served with green papaya, lime chilies and toasted peanuts. That's a poke bowl for each member of Destiny's child.

Red the Steakhouse

Poke in a steakhouse? It's Miami, remember? Red happens to have an entire raw bar, stacked with oysters, shrimp cocktails, lobster, stone crab and, of course, tuna poké. The Sushi Grade tuna is served with pineapple, wakame, cucumber and sesame. Sushi Grade means it's totally safe to eat raw, an important quality to have when you're poke.

The River Seafood & Oyster Bar

If oyster is in the name, fish is in the game. The River Seafood & Oyster serves a poke bowl over sushi rice with avocado and chiles. It's like the bibimbap of Hawaii.

Related Maps