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15 Formidable Tasting Menus in Orlando Right Now

For every taste and price point.

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Despite their high price tags, tasting menus flourish in every city enclave. After all, a curated, multicourse meal employing luxe, seasonal ingredients presents a financial windfall for restaurants while allowing the food-obsessed to witness chefs at their creative best.

With a few exceptions, most of the indulgent options below are well over $100 per person, though that doesn’t necessarily mean they don’t offer value. Note: menus, as do prices, change often, so be sure to pore over details on reservation sites before booking.

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This contemporary Korean restaurant, a la NYC stalwarts Atomix and Jungsik, dazzles with its 10-course tasting menus ($175) served at the six-seat chef’s counter. The selection of reimagined Hanguk creations is inspired by the seasons in Korea and is as pleasing to look at as they are to ingest. Makgeolli-braised baby pineapple with a gochujang-sugar cane glaze, trout roe, and black sesame is a work of art. At the same time, hamachi with konjac noodles, cucumber, and tomato-dongchimi shaved ice is a cool sweet-and-sour stunner. Add-ons include truffles ($50), caviar ($60), sake ($60) and wine ($85).

Soseki Modern Omakase

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Serving high-end, globally inspired, and seasonally driven omakases is what this cozy 10-seater by chef Michael Collantes is all about. Collantes and his tweezered band of culinarians present some of the most impeccable and artistically plated dishes Winter Park has seen. Omakases ($285) are offered in a multicourse “Explorer” option, showcasing seasonal, local bounty with global ingredients, or an “Atlantis” option, which dives into the diverse abundance of local and global waters. Beverage director Benjamin Coutts curates a program to enhance the experience for an additional $110 to an eye-popping $325.

Kadence

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Kadence became one of the city’s best restaurants the moment it opened back in 2017, and six years on, the eight-seat sushi and sake bar inside an all-black edifice still offers one of the best dining experiences in the city with its intimate omakase. Co-founders Mark Berdin and Jennifer Banagale and a dedicated team of cooks and servers continue to serve impeccably presented multicourse meals for $295. Sake pairings are offered in 3-, 5- and 7-glass pours for $30, $50, and $80.

Camille

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Chef Tung Phan’s creative and unconventional spins on Vietnamese dishes, all punctuated with classical French flourishes like espuma of pho, papaya with salmon and nước chấm and Vietnamese coffee-crusted Wagyu with potato pâvé are now presented in a gorgeous, 2,500-square-foot, 30-seat space with all the soothing spa feels. Snag a spot at the 8-seat chef’s counter and indulge in an intimate 10-course experience, all for $180, with sake pairings running $100 or $180 extra.

Foreigner Restaurant

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Bruno Fonseca’s high-end chef’s tasting pop-up concept is now ensconced in a stunning space where the Brazil-born chef and his team of “foreigners” (hailing from France, Syria, and, umm, Philly) present dishes that draw from global influences but lean ever so slightly to his native land. The multicourse, “confiance” menu ($195) focuses on local and luxe ingredients that change seasonally. The intimate space seats ten and offers two seatings for dinner. Beverage pairings range from $95-$190 with bonbons and a meal-ending coffee service included.

Chef's Table

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While chef-owners Kevin and Laurie Tarter have taken a back seat in the kitchen and handed duties over to executive chef Chandler Cook (Feather & Quill), the three-course prix-fixe menu is as lavish as ever and offered for a very reasonable $69.90. A meal could start with lamb bacon and beet salad before a main of veal au poivre, or mustard and sherry elk tenderloin, is presented with seasonal embellishments. Beignet-brioche doughnuts or orange bread pudding make worthy endings. Unsurprisingly, this kitchen does everything from bread to pickles in-house.

“Juju” is the Japanese word for the sizzling sound made from grilling meats. Still, the vibe inside this sister restaurant to Susuru nearly upstages the binchotan-seared yakitori, kushiyaki, and dry-aged fish. Stepping into the Showa-era-styled izakaya is like time-warping onto a Japanese movie set from the 1960s. It only enhances the seasonal tasting menu experience here, which features a meticulously presented multicourse meal ($180) at the 6-seat kappo bar with an optional sake pairing for $70 more.

Kabooki Sushi

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Chef Henry Moso’s extravagant, free-for-all omakases have become legendary for the ingredients he’s able to source both locally and globally, and the manner in which they’re presented. He doesn’t hold back during the 15-course extravaganza ($300) with cocktail, wine, and sake pairings ranging from $40 to $90. Omakases are offered at East Colonial Drive and Turkey Lake Road locations, but the trendy clientele is a given no matter the restaurant.

The five “waves” of Kaya’s $120 “sama sama” tasting menu present a host of dishes rooted not in the fried and porky Pinoy faves we’ve come to know and love, but in seafood and vegetables of the highest order, much of it locally sourced. No question, chef Lordfer Lalicon, and partner Jamilyn Bailey are out to test any preconceived notions people may have of Filipino fare. The beverage pairing features six selections of cocktails, wine, and sake for an additional $85.

Norman's Orlando

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After a three-and-a-half-year hiatus, Norman Van Aken’s eponymous restaurant is back in a new space with a new look but, thankfully, with its original Latin-Caribbean DNA still intact. Van Aken and chef Carlos Robles Molina’s degustation menu is a seasonal tour de force marrying flavors of the New World with those from the East – think Florida swordfish wrapped in Okinawan sweet potato or maple- and coffee-rubbed bison tenderloin served with a plum gastrique, navy bean refrito, bone marrow butter and smoked puffed sorghum. The five-course meal costs $170 with $65 and $95 wine pairing options.

Victoria & Albert's

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No question, this grande dame of Central Florida dining is easily the closest thing we have to Hawthorn, minus the murderous mayhem, of course. It is one of the most innovative, if not the priciest, eating experiences in town, with progressive prix-fixe meals ranging between $295 to $625 per person for the chef’s table experience with wine pairings. Along with dishes incorporating Cinco Jotas jamon Iberico, Rohan duck, A5 wagyu, and Royal Belgian caviar, it has an eclectic wine list with labels dating back to the early 1900s. This is Disney’s finest restaurant, if not Central Florida’s, so don’t dress like a putz.

Pretty plates of food influenced by the “Americas” are the focus of the five-course menu at this hotel resto, sitting next to a world-class sculpture garden. Table-wide participation is required to sample a menu starting with Peruvian duck nigiri or cobia maki and finding its form with poussin with foie snow or wagyu striploin. The cost is $119, with pairings ranging from $65 to $95.

Morimoto Asia

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It’s clear that Morimoto Asia executive chef Yuhi Fujinaga and executive sushi chef Alex Munkhbilguun are bent on offering the absolute finest cuts of fish and seafood procured from Toyosu Fish Market and around the world inside their sprawling, two-story Disney Springs behemoth. The $250 omakase is a refined and mind-blowing experience for the cuts alone – baby barracuda, butterfish, and beltfish from Kanagawa; whole firefly squid from Hyogo; line-caught horse mackerel from Kagoshima; Alaskan sea urchin and on it goes. Add to that the creativity, precision, and adherence to tradition the chefs possess (not to mention the 110 pounds of brown rice milled in-house daily), and the sushi program here may very well be the most “polished” in the region.

Jaleo by José Andrés

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Traditional and postmodern Spanish eats are a hallmark of Jaleo by noted chef José Andrés, and guests to his monolith at Disney Springs can partake in three different tasting menus, all highlighting the regional diversity of Spain. The “Jaleo Experience” presents an array of tapas items for $100, while his “¡Eat Like José!” gets a bit chichi with premium cuts of meat and luxe ingredients for $135. Pairings can be added for $49 or $65 more.

Monsieur Paul

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Footing the additional fare to get into Epcot is necessary to enjoy the Bocuse-ian delights of Monsieur Paul’s degustation menu. The elegant $195 experience is devoted to the art of “eating and drinking well,” which is a given considering dishes like coquilles Saint-Jacques, rack of lamb “en cocotte,” and vacherin glacé are all exquisitely presented. Oh, and if you’re considering wearing swimwear to the restaurant, don’t.

Doshi

This contemporary Korean restaurant, a la NYC stalwarts Atomix and Jungsik, dazzles with its 10-course tasting menus ($175) served at the six-seat chef’s counter. The selection of reimagined Hanguk creations is inspired by the seasons in Korea and is as pleasing to look at as they are to ingest. Makgeolli-braised baby pineapple with a gochujang-sugar cane glaze, trout roe, and black sesame is a work of art. At the same time, hamachi with konjac noodles, cucumber, and tomato-dongchimi shaved ice is a cool sweet-and-sour stunner. Add-ons include truffles ($50), caviar ($60), sake ($60) and wine ($85).

Soseki Modern Omakase

Serving high-end, globally inspired, and seasonally driven omakases is what this cozy 10-seater by chef Michael Collantes is all about. Collantes and his tweezered band of culinarians present some of the most impeccable and artistically plated dishes Winter Park has seen. Omakases ($285) are offered in a multicourse “Explorer” option, showcasing seasonal, local bounty with global ingredients, or an “Atlantis” option, which dives into the diverse abundance of local and global waters. Beverage director Benjamin Coutts curates a program to enhance the experience for an additional $110 to an eye-popping $325.

Kadence

Kadence became one of the city’s best restaurants the moment it opened back in 2017, and six years on, the eight-seat sushi and sake bar inside an all-black edifice still offers one of the best dining experiences in the city with its intimate omakase. Co-founders Mark Berdin and Jennifer Banagale and a dedicated team of cooks and servers continue to serve impeccably presented multicourse meals for $295. Sake pairings are offered in 3-, 5- and 7-glass pours for $30, $50, and $80.

Camille

Chef Tung Phan’s creative and unconventional spins on Vietnamese dishes, all punctuated with classical French flourishes like espuma of pho, papaya with salmon and nước chấm and Vietnamese coffee-crusted Wagyu with potato pâvé are now presented in a gorgeous, 2,500-square-foot, 30-seat space with all the soothing spa feels. Snag a spot at the 8-seat chef’s counter and indulge in an intimate 10-course experience, all for $180, with sake pairings running $100 or $180 extra.

Foreigner Restaurant

Bruno Fonseca’s high-end chef’s tasting pop-up concept is now ensconced in a stunning space where the Brazil-born chef and his team of “foreigners” (hailing from France, Syria, and, umm, Philly) present dishes that draw from global influences but lean ever so slightly to his native land. The multicourse, “confiance” menu ($195) focuses on local and luxe ingredients that change seasonally. The intimate space seats ten and offers two seatings for dinner. Beverage pairings range from $95-$190 with bonbons and a meal-ending coffee service included.

Chef's Table

While chef-owners Kevin and Laurie Tarter have taken a back seat in the kitchen and handed duties over to executive chef Chandler Cook (Feather & Quill), the three-course prix-fixe menu is as lavish as ever and offered for a very reasonable $69.90. A meal could start with lamb bacon and beet salad before a main of veal au poivre, or mustard and sherry elk tenderloin, is presented with seasonal embellishments. Beignet-brioche doughnuts or orange bread pudding make worthy endings. Unsurprisingly, this kitchen does everything from bread to pickles in-house.

Juju

“Juju” is the Japanese word for the sizzling sound made from grilling meats. Still, the vibe inside this sister restaurant to Susuru nearly upstages the binchotan-seared yakitori, kushiyaki, and dry-aged fish. Stepping into the Showa-era-styled izakaya is like time-warping onto a Japanese movie set from the 1960s. It only enhances the seasonal tasting menu experience here, which features a meticulously presented multicourse meal ($180) at the 6-seat kappo bar with an optional sake pairing for $70 more.

Kabooki Sushi

Chef Henry Moso’s extravagant, free-for-all omakases have become legendary for the ingredients he’s able to source both locally and globally, and the manner in which they’re presented. He doesn’t hold back during the 15-course extravaganza ($300) with cocktail, wine, and sake pairings ranging from $40 to $90. Omakases are offered at East Colonial Drive and Turkey Lake Road locations, but the trendy clientele is a given no matter the restaurant.

Kaya

The five “waves” of Kaya’s $120 “sama sama” tasting menu present a host of dishes rooted not in the fried and porky Pinoy faves we’ve come to know and love, but in seafood and vegetables of the highest order, much of it locally sourced. No question, chef Lordfer Lalicon, and partner Jamilyn Bailey are out to test any preconceived notions people may have of Filipino fare. The beverage pairing features six selections of cocktails, wine, and sake for an additional $85.

Norman's Orlando

After a three-and-a-half-year hiatus, Norman Van Aken’s eponymous restaurant is back in a new space with a new look but, thankfully, with its original Latin-Caribbean DNA still intact. Van Aken and chef Carlos Robles Molina’s degustation menu is a seasonal tour de force marrying flavors of the New World with those from the East – think Florida swordfish wrapped in Okinawan sweet potato or maple- and coffee-rubbed bison tenderloin served with a plum gastrique, navy bean refrito, bone marrow butter and smoked puffed sorghum. The five-course meal costs $170 with $65 and $95 wine pairing options.

Victoria & Albert's

No question, this grande dame of Central Florida dining is easily the closest thing we have to Hawthorn, minus the murderous mayhem, of course. It is one of the most innovative, if not the priciest, eating experiences in town, with progressive prix-fixe meals ranging between $295 to $625 per person for the chef’s table experience with wine pairings. Along with dishes incorporating Cinco Jotas jamon Iberico, Rohan duck, A5 wagyu, and Royal Belgian caviar, it has an eclectic wine list with labels dating back to the early 1900s. This is Disney’s finest restaurant, if not Central Florida’s, so don’t dress like a putz.

BACÁN

Pretty plates of food influenced by the “Americas” are the focus of the five-course menu at this hotel resto, sitting next to a world-class sculpture garden. Table-wide participation is required to sample a menu starting with Peruvian duck nigiri or cobia maki and finding its form with poussin with foie snow or wagyu striploin. The cost is $119, with pairings ranging from $65 to $95.

Morimoto Asia

It’s clear that Morimoto Asia executive chef Yuhi Fujinaga and executive sushi chef Alex Munkhbilguun are bent on offering the absolute finest cuts of fish and seafood procured from Toyosu Fish Market and around the world inside their sprawling, two-story Disney Springs behemoth. The $250 omakase is a refined and mind-blowing experience for the cuts alone – baby barracuda, butterfish, and beltfish from Kanagawa; whole firefly squid from Hyogo; line-caught horse mackerel from Kagoshima; Alaskan sea urchin and on it goes. Add to that the creativity, precision, and adherence to tradition the chefs possess (not to mention the 110 pounds of brown rice milled in-house daily), and the sushi program here may very well be the most “polished” in the region.

Jaleo by José Andrés

Traditional and postmodern Spanish eats are a hallmark of Jaleo by noted chef José Andrés, and guests to his monolith at Disney Springs can partake in three different tasting menus, all highlighting the regional diversity of Spain. The “Jaleo Experience” presents an array of tapas items for $100, while his “¡Eat Like José!” gets a bit chichi with premium cuts of meat and luxe ingredients for $135. Pairings can be added for $49 or $65 more.

Monsieur Paul

Footing the additional fare to get into Epcot is necessary to enjoy the Bocuse-ian delights of Monsieur Paul’s degustation menu. The elegant $195 experience is devoted to the art of “eating and drinking well,” which is a given considering dishes like coquilles Saint-Jacques, rack of lamb “en cocotte,” and vacherin glacé are all exquisitely presented. Oh, and if you’re considering wearing swimwear to the restaurant, don’t.

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